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Clicker Training, Hypnotherapy and Trypophobia

Trypophobia and Clicker Training

Clicker training you may have heard of especially if you are into dog training, hypnotherapy every one has heard of, but trypophobia, what the heck is that? How can these 3 words be in the same sentence you ask, read on…

What is Trypophobia

Trypophobia – look it up, that is if you don’t suffer from this phobia otherwise I wouldn’t recommend it as Google is full of trigger images.

I can’t speak for everyone as we all vary, but my trigger images are mainly but not exclusively found in nature. I have triggers with some man-made patterns too. By now are you getting some idea?

Trypophobia for me is a phobia of repeating patterns. But there is one thing I can’t put into words and that’s how it makes me feel. I think it started as a kid, although I don’t know why or how. My mum doesn’t know either.

So how does clicker training and hypnotherapy come into the same blog post?

Hypnotherapy

In 2012 ish, I went for hypnotherapy to help me with my running, sure it helped temporarily, but in her room, something made my trypo ten times worse. I already suffered but during this hypnotherapy session, something happened. She asked me if I had any phobias, I told her, I said I don’t really like that pointing to an ornament of some creature thing with a scaly pattern on it. I thought no more of it. So we did the hypnotherapy thing and that night I went home jumped on the treadmill and ran like the clappers.

However, there was quite an extreme side effect. When I was walking my dogs at a certain point walking around the paddock I had an extreme emotional reaction. I burst into tears, it was really bad actually but I can’t explain it any more than that.

I walked around 3 times or so and thought, I can’t bloody have this. I tried to figure out what it was. Was it the clover? There’s a patch of clover up the field that has really small leaves, drives me crazy sometimes, but I walk over it several times a day, so learn to ignore it.

The Dog Training Clicker saved the dayClicker for dog training

I can’t remember if it was that day or the next day, but I’d made some Madeira cake (or had I bought it, probably the latter knowing my baking skills). So I got my clicker and headed up the field alone, cake in hand.

I had already identified that moment where the emotion built up, so with that in mind before this happened, I clicked then filled my gob with Madeira cake. Repeat x 3 or 4 times.

Cured…

Would you bloody believe it, I had cured myself. Well, let’s be fair, I couldn’t carry on like that could I, balling every time I walked around the field?

It was definitely something to do with the hypnotherapy and the existing phobia but thanks to clicker training, it and I saved the day.

Now I still get the heeby-jeebies at certain triggers. My worst is bearded dragons and similar. I don’t like the vaseline advert with all those people on it with their hands in the air and the channel 5 logo with all the little wavey bits on it.

Do you have a similar story relating to clicker training or suffer the same weird or another type of weird phobia that you have no explanation for?

Please comment below, I’d love to hear your stories.

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Puppy Training – The Recall

Puppy Training puppies

Puppy Recall – Teaching your puppy to come back when called © Sarah Gleave – 

Please share with full credit and do not copy without permission. Please link back to www.megheathdogleads.co.uk 

Read these notes first –

  1. Always reward a recall and never scold your puppy for not coming back when called.
  2. Do not repeatedly call your puppy who is not coming back to you.
  3. Use appropriate rewards – what your puppy likes, not what you think he should like – suggestions are favourite food (not kibble – this is your puppies usual food), favourite novel toy, praise or all 3.
  4. Never assume a young puppy recall is a fully trained behaviour, it is not.
  5. Never ignore a recall done of your puppy’s own free will. Praise spontaneous recalls. Meaning the times your puppy returns to you without you calling them.
  6. Never allow an untrained puppy to practice running away, the behaviour becomes self-reinforcing (practised).
  7. Beware of never letting your puppy off the lead because you daren’t – train him/her!
  8. Never chase after a puppy that is running off. Be aware of laughing and thinking it is funny, your puppy will pick up on this.
  9. Always teach puppies & dogs as soon as you get them home. Often the first training session is the one they will learn the most from, so plan it well.
  10. ALWAYS start your training with your puppy close to you, in a safe area and on a long training lead.
  11. ALWAYS gain your puppies full attention & secure him on a lead or take hold of his collar when he returns before rewarding.
  12. ALWAYS reward each and every return to you, in the early stages even when he comes to you without being called.
  13. ALWAYS be sure that a command is followed by the desired response, if not then you have rushed ahead in the schedule.
  14. You may use a whistle, a verbal command and/or a hand signal, followed by a reward. Any combination may then be used in the absence of the other.
  15. Be aware of de-training, by following commands with something negative.

So teaching the recall …

The concept behind this is what most people get wrong. Your puppy is not born knowing what a recall is, so why are you using a command that has not been taught? In my method, you are teaching (managing, enticing etc) a recall without using a command yet, this is why you need a long training line. The training lead stops your dog from running off and is an essential tool for my recall notes.

*** Proven method used time and time again for puppies, dogs and established runners***

Prepare – what rewards are you using? If in doubt, give the dog a choice. What call are you using? Name – come? Stick to the same command.

Tip – When you first start your training program with your puppy, they often pick up on the very earliest cues. So the first things you start rewarding might often be the ones s/he learns the best. Be aware and make your body language nice and clear. Remember less is more.

  1. Manage your puppies motivation (i.e. if using food, is he hungry, if using play, is the toy novel, if using praise, does your puppy receive attention when it is not earned and does he perceive your praise as a reward)?
  2. Your puppy must want to come to you of his own free will initially. So wander around on your walk and either wait for your puppy to pop over and say hi or lure with a treat or toy.
  3. Walk your puppy on a long line (5-10 metres) on normal exercise, reward every return to you of his own free will (without using a command). This is the most important phase of the training technique. Your puppy MUST ** want ** to come to you!!! And to get this it must be managed not forced. [1]
  4. If using food, continually manage your puppies food motivation, you could use his meals as part of the training sessions. You should always feed after walks anyway – never before (for health reasons). If using praise, save your praise for when he earns it. If using a toy, save a special toy for walks / training only. With food, feed your puppy at night and do not give meals during the day (in extreme cases – not usually with puppies though – this is more for difficult adult dogs). It IS possible to food train a puppy that appears not to be food motivated. Food helps with training; there is no denying that, but not all puppies and dogs find food rewarding. If you can use food and praise then this is great. SUGGESTIONS – cheese, hot dogs (although can be high in salt), real meat, bought treats etc.
  5. Your puppy will learn to return to you because you are providing him with something he wants and he finds it rewarding. This may take time and can take anything from a few minutes to a few weeks to achieve, but when your puppy realises that coming to you is beneficial then we are on track.
  6. When the returns to you are frequent and pretty much guaranteed, you can start to introduce a command. ‘Name COME’ (or whistle, just his name, hand signal etc.)
  7. Keep your body language simple. Don’t run around doing star jumps and calling him. Stand still & square and call him with intention.
  8. Say the command when he has returned to you (not while he is out on the field OR when he is coming to you, ONLY when he has reached you). Sounds odd but at this point, you are pairing what he is already doing with a command – the one you want to teach.
  9. This conditions the command and associates it with the reward and being by you (near enough to hold the collar).
  10. As your puppy builds up an association with the command and being by you, you can start to use the command when he is returning to you, i.e. you can guarantee he will be coming to you as he runs in your direction.
  11. Only when you are confident he will come to you 100% of the time do you then start calling him while he is not distracted.
  12. Gradually build up the distractions, i.e. when he is interacting with another dog, sniffing the floor etc.
  13. Start in  ZERO DISTRACTION AREA. Then carefully start to take him to a different area with different and increased distractions. You will probably need to revert back to an earlier stage of training in a new environment.

[1] Previous learning will affect this. The time spent allowing your puppy to run off or repeated calling will hinder your training. Only a complete transformation to religious retraining will change this.

TIP Put the lead on your dog frequently even though you are not going home, dogs can perceive the end of a walk (going home) as a mild punishment and may play ‘catch me’ when they know you are taking them home!

© Sarah Gleave Updated 20th March 2017

IMPORTANT 

Remember, if using food, allow for the number of treats used and reduce his dinner accordingly. A fat puppy is not a healthy puppy.

NEVER allow a dog to run next to dangerous areas such as train lines, busy roads or dangerous water.
 NEVER underestimate your dog’s ability to run off in hot pursuit of something nicer than your reward.

The Recall is one of the LIFESAVER exercises you will teach your dog. Make it good and reliable, one day it will save his life.
 You will be proud of him when he comes back on command.

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Basic obedience of the Dog Aggressive canine

Disclaimer

In all my years of working with and training dogs, I have never owned or trained a Bull Breed, so I don’t profess to be an expert with them in any way shape or form, Springers were and are my thing. However, the dog in this blog was amazingly responsive to this technique and the best I gained from the whole shitty situation was that she was impeccably trained after I did some intensive basic obedience with her.

Control and manners was key.

The purpose of this disclaimer is to say this is OUR STORY and our story only but what I will say is that basic obedience has never failed me. It is the one thing that most family dogs lack.  The basic obedience I write about in this blog has not cured this dog, what it has done is made sure that when I ask her to come, wait or sit, then she does without delay (mostly), she has respect for me and knows her place in the pack.

Please read bearing the above in mind and hope that the blog helps you in some way.

History

FTGHFB dog! Free to a good home Facebook dog, rescued by a kind group concerned for her welfare and handed over to a rescue, she was about 7 months old at this point and suspected either American Bulldog cross or Staffy cross. No real history but we did know that she had a pinned leg – suspected RTA at around 5 months of age. I fostered for said rescue and kept her. She doesn’t have any problems with her back legs, sometimes a little lame but overall a very happy little dog. Beautiful nature and initially amazing with all of my dogs and great with people and still is.

Over the months she lived with my pack however pre-walk excitement started to become a problem. Ears were getting nipped and what looked like minor playful borderline aggression started to show. We had her neutered after consulting with the vet 9 weeks after the start of her first season. It didn’t change anything. I’m not saying I regret that she would have been neutered anyway as should all bitches (my opinion).

As the weeks went on, she started attacking my dogs, mainly the lower pack members or smaller dogs. There came a point where this could not continue and she had to be separated. She was still friends with Top, one of the other rescues (a large dog) and Marley, one of mine and again a large dog. She was still friends with little Breeze the Spaniel… until…

The final straw

The final straw was when she attacked a customers dog. She was on a short lead but not muzzled, I thought on lead was enough control but in this case, it wasn’t to my detriment. It wasn’t pretty but not too bad. 2 puncture wounds about 1.5cm across on the back of the neck that didn’t heal too well as the dog kept shaking its head due to ear problems. We took him to the vets and all was well. Except I’ve not heard from that customer since despite him being one of my best customers, but you can’t blame him.

We nearly said goodbye that weekend, but as the hours went on, I knew I simply could not do it.

I had been doing obedience with her before this incident, but it was apparent that basic obedience was never going to be a cure, it would just add control. The end result is she is not allowed to mix with any other dog apart from Top, he is her only friend.

An interesting but sad thing happened after this incident. Breeze – her best friend, saw her attack my customers dog. I still used to walk her with Top and Breeze albeit muzzled but one morning, Breeze attacked her quite savagely, for a Springer at least anyway. She made a mess of her ear and tore a hole in her leg. It wasn’t that bad by the next day, just a bit of soreness on her ear and a clean puncture wound on her leg. She was unphased by it all. And if that wasn’t enough, our new girl – Maisie fed off Breeze’s behaviour and she also does not like her now. So I have 3 bitches who cannot mix (Breeze and Maisie are now best friends).

So where are we now? She lives on her own but mixes with Top on walks. She’s a naturally solitary animal as she shows no signs of worry and is by all accounts a very happy go, lucky little girl.

BASIC OBEDIENCE

  • THE RECALL (a formal competitive obedience style recall – from a sit stay to present in front and then round to the side in a sit at heel which means you have an informal recall whenever you need it)
  • SIT STAY
  • WALK TO HEEL (again, competitive obedience style heelwork)

THE RECALL

It’s all here in my other Blog. Teaching your dog to come when called.

THE SIT

Do I need to teach you how to teach a dog to sit? OK, the difference is this is a reliable sit, asked for once, responded to immediately and the dog stays there until you give the release command. I won’t go through the actual teaching the sit as that’s easy but what I will do is just give you some tips.

  • Ask once, speak clearly
  • Assuming you are using the lure method (treat or toy in hand raised up – bottom down), phase out your lure, the hand gesture you have just used (raising hand) becomes an empty hand and the treat/toy reward becomes a verbal and/or physical reward.
  • Use a gesture for every command, hand signal, call it what you want (it will come in handy when your dog loses its hearing – all my dogs respond to hand signals for directional commands, for example, go that way, come this way, over here, get out the way etc)
  • Stand up straight, don’t lean over, this becomes part of the visual cue for the behaviour
  • Be firm but kind, don’t lose your rag, if you do, quit and apologise to your dog! Start again with a better attitude!
  • Be assertive – mean what you say. Don’t fanny about.

SIT AND WAIT / DISTANCE CONTROL

  • Continue with sit training, add a flat palm signalling STAY THERE!
  • Release & praise
  • Repeat flat palm (your new hand gesture/hand signal)

Phase 2

  • Sit command, flat palm “stay!” take one step back then step back in. Reward.
  • Repeat.

Phase 3

  • … jumps ahead … At the stage where you are teaching a sit stay DO NOT EVER RECALL YOUR DOG. This is saved for the fully trained sit stay, you never call your dog from a sit stay while they are in training as they will predict your call and break the stay.
  • It is a slow process but obviously depends on your skill and the dogs’ trainability.
  • Stepping away is done tentatively and you ALWAYS RETURN TO THE DOG
  • Difficulty levels include walking around your dog, moving further away, moving your arms (i.e. increasing distractions) etc
  • NEVER EVER increase the difficulty beyond what your dog can succeed at. Training is all about managing success and helping your dog to get it right. This omits the requirement for punishment, not that I think there is any place for punishment in dog training as dogs will never ‘actually learn’ a behaviour from being bollocked for the wrong thing. RANT – so telling your dog off for not coming back – you really think they will learn to come to you next time? Really OK, next time, try a stuffed toy!!! RANT OVER

Final Phase PUTTING THE RECALL AND SIT STAY TOGETHER

  • You feel you are at the stage now where your dogs sit-stay is reliable? It may be some time down the line. Still, keep reinforcing the sit stay WITHOUT a recall to keep this behaviour nicely reinforced.

HEELWORK

Granted, this method works better with dogs who can be easily lured with food. Dogs who are more easily distracted or difficult to motivate are beyond the scope of this blog – sorry.

  • Do this exercise when you aren’t going anywhere, this is purely a training exercise although you can practice it anywhere as long as you are both focussed and not disturbed by distractions.
  • Dog starting point, is front present (dog sits facing you) take your food lure and guide dog to the left behind your legs, the aim is for dogs bum to work independently swinging out and round, the dog comes to your side in a straight line, bum does not swing out to the left. Food treat is your cue/gesture, which is now placed on your left hip. Not easy without a video which I will post in due course.
  • Repeat.
  • The heel work is a progression of this exercise. Once the dog is at your side, you will take one step forward.
  • Skills your dog will acquire – front moves independently of the rear, they learn to bend in the middle!

Meg Heath Dog Leads makes leads and walking aids to help with many dog training issues, they are as follows:

THE SIMPLE LEADER DOG HEADCOLLAR fits over your dogs head like a horses head collar, adds control to your dog walks.

DOG TRAINING LEAD You can’t teach a recall without a dog training lead. Why? Because as your dog chooses to do his own thing, where is your control? There is none.

These are just 2 of our products, have a browse around our website.

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Is your dog trying to be the pack leader?

Putting aside those that disagree with using the word ‘pack’ and pack leader, this blog post is about misunderstood dogs and my humble opinion, an opinion based on over 30 years experience working and living with large groups of dogs.

So here’s my story and I hope it will help some people explain their dogs’ behaviour.

Disclaimer: This post is not the answer to all your dogs’ aggression problems, seek help if you are experiencing problems, don’t give your dog away to a pound or sell them on Scumtree. Ask for help from a respected Vet that cares and is educated about behaviour (not all are in fact not many are) or go to an experienced, qualified behaviourist.

What you see – a dog creating havoc around other dogs who are just trying to play

What I see – a dog trying to restore order amongst what he / she sees to be a rowdy misbehaving group of dogs

What i see as an extreme – you are walking your dog and pass another dog and your dog goes crazy at the ‘innocent dog’ (of course this isn’t always why)

Over the years, I’ve had dogs who have been aggressive towards a group of dogs, they run up to them barking and creating, worst case scenario they do actually bite them. I’ve seen dogs with 1 or 2 puncture wounds who were at the receiving end of one of these types of dogs.

The penny drops

My theories come as revelations, the penny drops as it were as the so-called naughty dog grows up and shows more and more signs that all he ever was, was the aspiring pack leader. When you live and work with groups of dogs you learn a lot more than people who only ever have one dog. You will see different behaviours when you have 2 dogs and you will even see these behaviours when you have an ‘only dog’ as

Is your dog trying to be the pack leader
Is your dog trying to be the pack leader

You become their pack as a mixed species group.

Back to the pack word. Some people don’t like the word pack or pack leader, well I’ve got news for you, it’s a fact. A pack whether you like it or not is the name given to a group of dogs, it is a hierarchy, guinea pigs have them, spiders have them, even mixed species form a group or hierarchy, christ you’ve seen people on Facebook haven’t you, they are the worst hierarchy!!!

Go easy on your dog and do some basic obedience with them. The recall is the first behaviour you should be teaching and a ‘sit by me and wait until I jolly well release you’ command or just keep them on the bloody lead if you can’t control them. It is also VERY important to note that if you have no control over your dog, this type of behaviour will be worse. In your mixed hierarchy of humans and dogs, you must be top dog. You can get away with humanising your dog, jeez look at Robert!!!! The difference is, Robert was trained to within an inch of his life at 7 weeks. He is allowed on the bed and knows it’s his dog-given right to be there. Crikey, if he ever had to go into kennels (that won’t happen), he’d be like “where’s the king size and me blankie mum?”

Are they trying to be the pack leader?

Taking control of your dog-human relationship, some easy facts to get to grips with –

  • Teach basic obedience, first – recall, second – sit and stay there until I tell you otherwise (i.e. dog doesn’t move in their own time, you make the decisions), lie down – not too important if you have a good sit, as long as they are staying put then we are good.
  • NOW HERE’S THE KILLER CONUNDRUM —- Whatever you ask your doing to do (must be a learned command – I don’t like the word command, but I’ll use it anyway, don’t be asking them to do something in a loooong English sentence that your dog will NEVER know what the bloody hell you are on about, unless you are Robert of the Heath aka Golden Paws), FOLLOW IT THROUGH…So –
  • You ask your dog to do a learned command, then they MUST DO IT.
  • Most people I see asking their dog to do something say something like – oh he’s not listening today… I don’t wanna hear this, it’s pathetic.
  • SO in simple terms, it goes like this > human gives command > dog does it….oh wait, isn’t that easy peasy?

Disclaimer: This post is not the answer to all your dogs’ aggression problems, seek help if you are experiencing problems, don’t give your dog away to a pound or sell them on Scumtree. Ask for help from a respected Vet that cares and is educated about behaviour (not all are in fact not many are) or go to an experienced, qualified behaviourist.

Meg Heath Dog Leads sells dog training leads that help with the recall, heck I’ve even written a how to teach your dog to come when called blog post.

I have also got Design Rights on The Simple Leader, made by my own fair hand and little fingers to help control dogs that pull.

If you need advice on stuff training related and what lead or collar to buy then call me on 01522 810150.

 

 

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How To Teach A Dog To Come Back When Called

recall

The Recall as dog trainers call it is the art of getting your dog to come to you when you call him (I’ll use him throughout the article). I call it an art because I believe it to be one of the hardest lessons to teach our dogs. There are so many distractions when teaching the recall, which makes it one of the most difficult and one of the hardest to train well.

How to change your dog’s recall behaviour immediately with 5 easy changes:

  • Use a long line training lead of at least 5 metres
  • Work in a no or low distraction area
  • Give yourself time rather than a rushed walk before work
  • Re-evaluate the rewards used, use what your dog finds rewarding not what you have decided is rewarding
  • And above all be calm and patient, if you or the dog is not relaxed, you will hinder your progress

My top tip: “Praise spontaneous & willing returns to you.”

Before you teach the recall

The concept behind this is what most people get wrong. Your dog is not born knowing what a recall is, so why are you using a command that has not been taught? In my method, you are teaching (managing, enticing etc) a recall without using a command yet, this is why you need a long training line. The training lead stops your dog from running off and is an essential tool for my recall notes.

Prepare – what rewards are you using? If in doubt, give the dog a choice. What call are you using? Name – come?

When you first start your training program, dogs often pick up on the very earliest cues. So the first things you start rewarding might often be the ones s/he learns the best. Be aware and make your body language nice and clear. Remember less is more.

Here is a checklist of all the main points to remember:

  1. Always reward a recall and never scold a dog for not coming back.
  2. Do not repeatedly call a dog who is not coming back to you.
  3. Use appropriate rewards – what your dog likes, not what you think he should like – suggestions are a favourite food, like chicken, hot dogs cheese that kind of thing (not kibble though, it needs to be something special and not their daily food), favourite novel toy, praise or all 3.
  4. Never assume a young puppy recall is a fully trained behaviour, it usually is not.
  5. Never ignore a recall done of the dogs own free will. Praise spontaneous willing returns to you – meaning the times your dog returned to you without you calling them.
  6. Never allow an untrained dog to practice running away, the behaviour becomes self-reinforcing (practised).
  7. Beware of never letting your dog off the lead because you daren’t – train him/her! (Use a long line leash).
  8. Never chase after a dog that is running off. Be aware of laughing and thinking it is funny, the dog will pick up on this.
  9. Always teach puppies & dogs as soon as you get them home. Often the first training session is the one they will learn the most from, so plan it well.
  10. Start your training with your dog close to you, in a safe area and on a long training lead.
  11. Gain your dog’s full attention & secure him on a lead or take hold of his collar when he returns before rewarding. Then release or put the leash back on.
  12. Reward each and every return to you, in the early stages even when he comes to you without being called.
  13. Be sure that a command is followed by the desired response, if not then you have rushed ahead in the schedule.
  14. You may use a whistle, a verbal command and/or a hand signal, followed by a reward. Any combination may then be used in the absence of the other.
  15. Be aware of de-training, by following commands with something negative.

Procedure

  1. Manage the dog’s motivation (i.e. if using food, is he hungry, if using play, is the toy novel, if using praise, does the dog receive attention when it is not earned and does he perceive your praise as a reward)?
  2. Your dog must want to come to you of his own free will initially. So wander around on your walk and either wait for your dog to pop over and say hi or lure with a treat or toy.
  3. Walk dog on a long line (5-10 metres) on normal exercise, reward every return to you of his own free will (without using a command). This is the most important phase of the training technique. Your dog MUST ‘want’ to come to you. And to get this it must be managed not forced. [1]
  4. If using food, continually manage the dog’s food motivation, you could use his meals as part of the training sessions. You should always feed after walks anyway – never before (for health reasons). If using praise, save your praise for when he earns it. If using a toy, save a special toy for walks/training only. With food, feed your dog at night and do not give meals during the day (in extreme cases). It IS possible to food train a dog that appears not to be food motivated. Food helps with training; there is no denying that, but not all dogs like food as a reward. If you can use food and praise then this is great. SUGGESTIONS – cheese, hot dogs (although can be high in salt), real meat, bought treats etc.
  5. The dog will learn to return to you because you are providing him with something he wants and he finds it rewarding. This may take time and can take anything from a few minutes to a few weeks to achieve, but when your dog realises that coming to you is beneficial then we are on track.
  6. When the returns to you are frequent and pretty much guaranteed, you can start to introduce a command. ‘Name COME’ (or whistle, just his name, hand signal etc.)
  7. Keep your body language simple. Don’t run around doing star jumps and calling him. Stand still & square and call him with intention.
  8. Say the command when he has returned to you (not while he is out in the field OR when he is coming to you, ONLY when he has reached you). Sounds odd but at this point, you are pairing what he is already doing with a command – the one you want to teach.
  9. This conditions the command and associates it with the reward and being by you (near enough to hold the collar).
  10. As he builds up an association with the command and being by you, you can start to use the command when he is returning to you, i.e. you can guarantee he will be coming to you as he runs in your direction.
  11. Only when you are confident he will come to you 100% of the time do you then start calling him while he is not distracted.
  12. Gradually build up the distractions, i.e. when he is interacting with another dog, sniffing the floor etc.
  13. Start in  ZERO DISTRACTION AREA. Then carefully start to take him to a different area with different and increased distractions. You will probably need to revert back to an earlier stage of training in a new environment.

Notes

[1] Previous learning will affect this. The time spent allowing your dog to run off or repeated calling will hinder your training. Only a complete transformation to religious retraining will change this.

TIP Put the lead on your dog frequently even though you are not going home, dogs can perceive the end of a walk (going home) as a mild punishment and may play ‘catch me’ when they know you are taking them home!

IMPORTANT

Remember, if using food, allow for the number of treats used and reduce dinner accordingly. A fat dog is not a healthy dog.

NEVER allow a dog to run next to dangerous areas such as train lines, busy roads or dangerous water.

NEVER underestimate your dog’s ability to run off in hot pursuit of something nicer than your reward.

The Recall is one of the LIFESAVER exercises you will teach your dog. Make it good and reliable, one day it will save his life.
 You will be proud of him when he comes back on command.

Please share with full credit and do not copy without permission.

© Sarah Gleave Updated 15th June 2018